A. Orsay virus is the only virus capable of naturally infecting C. elegans.  B. Schema of Orsay protein expression strategy defined in this study. C.  A peptide spanning the ribosomal framshifting site was detected by Mass spectrometry. D. Electron microscopy of highly purified Orsay virions.

Exploring novel biology through a nematode virus

Orsay virus utilizes ribosomal frameshifting to express a novel protein that is incorporated into virions Read the full article on ScienceDirect. Orsay virus is the first identified virus capable of naturally infecting Caenorhabditis elegans. Our recent discovery of Orsay virus along with two other nematode infecting viruses, Santueil and Le Blanc, enables for the first…

Virology Highlights blog (1)

Probing the interaction between host cellular mRNA 3′-UTRs and a viral product

In vitro selection of the 3′-untranslated regions of the human liver mRNA that bind to the HCV nonstructural protein 5B Read the full article on ScienceDirect. After evading the innate immune system, the hepatitis C virus (HCV) efficiently establishes a persistent infection in which immune-mediated liver injury develops chronic hepatitis. The molecular mechanisms advantageous to…

The epidemic emergence of norovirus GII.4 Sydney 2012. (A) Prevalence of circulating norovirus genotypes in the Oceania region (Australia and New Zealand) shown monthly between January 2009 and December 2012. The results show the annual peaks in norovirus activity as well as the shift in prevalence between the GII.4 variants New Orleans 2009 and Sydney 2012 that occurred during late 2012. The monthly prevalence of each GII.4 variant is shown according to the key provided. (B) Phylogeny of the recently circulating GII.4 variants using 286 complete capsid sequences, of which 221 were derived from this study. Clades are coloured as panel. The X-axis is scaled to time (years) with individual tips representing time points of sample collection and is shared with panel A.

Understanding emergence to control norovirus epidemics

The emergence and evolution of the novel epidemic norovirus GII.4 variant Sydney 2012 Read the full article on ScienceDirect. Noroviruses are the most common cause of acute gastroenteritis, globally, and have become increasingly notorious in recent years following a number of devastating pandemics that caused the widespread shutdown of nursing homes, hospitals and child care…

Polio

The Virologist’s Bookshelf – Part 2

In this continuing series of blog posts, the Editor-in-Chief of Virology, Michael Emerman, recommends books chosen for their descriptions of the roles of viruses and viral disease in the broader contexts of human health, society and history. Here’s part 2, with a book about polio and another on influenza. Polio: An American Story – David…

Schematic of the progression of HIV infection and the influence of A3G. Viral particles (purple) with a fixed fraction containing A3G (orange) infect cells (cyan). Reverse transcription converts viral RNA (yellow) into proviral DNA (blue). The resulting proviral DNA can contain stop codons (stop sign) if the infecting virion contains A3G. Proviral DNA containing stop codons do not yield infectious progeny virions. When the fraction of virions containing A3G is small, infection is sustained (left), whereas when it crosses a critical value, infection dies out (right).

Suppressing productive HIV infection: the evolutionary arms race between viruses and their hosts

Estimating the fraction of progeny virions that must incorporate APOBEC3G for suppression of productive HIV-1 infection  Read the full article on ScienceDirect. The interaction between the human protein APOBEC3G (A3G) and the HIV protein Vif is a remarkable example of the evolutionary arms race between viruses and their hosts. A3G expressed in HIV infected cells…

Slide1

The common cold virus uses a unique ‘switch’ during lung infection

Differential cleavage of IRES trans-acting factors (ITAFs) in cells infected by human rhinovirus Read the full article on ScienceDirect. Human rhinovirus (HRV) is a major causative agent of the common cold and has important health implications, especially for individuals suffering from asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Understanding HRV RNA replication and how it interacts…

TheHotZone

The Virologist’s Bookshelf – Part 1

In this new series of blog posts on Virology Highlights, the Editor-in-Chief of Virology, Michael Emerman, recommends reading material for virologists and others interested in viruses and their impacts. These are not textbooks or reference books, but rather books chosen for their descriptions of the roles of viruses and viral disease in the broader contexts…

New ways of looking at viral replication

Methylation of translation elongation factor 1A by the METTL10-like See1 methyltransferase facilitates tombusvirus replication in yeast and plants Read the full article on ScienceDirect. Viruses are intracellular parasites that take advantage of the host cell’s resources, including subcellular membranes and host proteins for their replication. The multiplication of the viral RNA for the plant-infecting tombusviruses…